How to choose an editor #writingcommunity #writing #editing

writer

A new year means that many of us will be assessing the past year and making plans for the future. If your resolutions and goals include finishing that novel, or self-publishing or submitting to an agent, you should consider using an editor to make sure your manuscript is up to scratch.

The boom in self-publishing, as with any industry, means that a multitude of businesses have sprung up around writing. There are editors aplenty out there, but not all of them are up to the job. I’ve worked with countless writers who have paid hard-earned money to editors who haven’t a clue what they’re doing. As a writer myself, I understand how fellow writers feel about their work, and also how difficult it can be to hand that manuscript over to someone else, often someone you don’t know, and trusting them to do a good job. So what should you expect from an editor? And what should you look for when choosing one?

Testimonials

Look for testimonials from previous clients. If an editor can’t provide testimonials, find out why. When I began my business, I provided free edits in return for honest testimonials. This way I began to build a reputation and a client base (most of those clients that I provided free edits for came back to me with their next projects) and could also provide new clients with evidence that I could actually do the job. I’m happy to say that since then I have had testimonials from many clients and that now most of my work comes from happy clients who come back to me.

Sample edits

An editor should offer to provide you with a free sample edit. This way you can see how they work and see if it is right for you.

A contract

An editor should provide you with a contract setting out exactly what you should expect and what the editor also expects from you. This contract should include dates, fees and a summary of what’s included in your edit.

A price

I have worked with clients who have lost money to unscrupulous editors including one client whose ‘editor’ asked her to pay up front and then didn’t deliver. OK, you might think she was naïve to pay out, but this was new territory for her and she was unsure how things work. Unfortunately, I’ve also worked with clients who have paid the deposit, received their edit and then vanished without paying the balance. It goes with the territory, but please don’t be that person.

Make sure you know the rate, and when you’re expected to pay. And please do stick to this.

A reasonable timescale

Your editor should give you a date when your edit will be done and back to you. If they can’t commit to a date, ask yourself why. I’ve heard of editors who haven’t delivered when promised, have made excuse after excuse or have refused to give a firm date in the first place. Where does this leave a writer with a publication date in mind? And don’t let the process go on for months and months. If I have an editing project then that is what I work on – it takes priority. I plan my schedule so that projects – paid for writing projects or editing projects – take priority over everything else. I give a client a firm date – usually ten working days for an edit of a manuscript of up to 80,000 words. I have seen editors who will take up to six weeks to do the same amount of work. That’s fine if that works for you – but make sure it does work for you and that the deadline is agreed by both of you.

Honesty

Sometimes this is a hard one to take. It’s not very nice having someone tell you about all the faults in your work, all those things that don’t work. But an editor should do this. What’s the point otherwise? I know that I have built a bit of a reputation for my honesty – and that some people don’t see that as a good thing. They usually don’t ask me to edit their full manuscripts if they don’t like my honest appraisal of their sample. Which is probably a good thing. If you’re paying money to someone to edit your work then you must realise that the editor isn’t there to pat you on the back and tell you what a great writer you are. They are there to offer a professional, unbiased, honest critique of your work and to show you how to improve it and get it to a publishable standard. Yes, I do compliment a writer on things they have done well, things that really work. But what’s the point of me glossing over something that isn’t right? Something that doesn’t work? That will mean you’ve wasted your money. As one of my clients says:

‘Alison will pull no punches, but then, why would you want her to? You want your book to be the best it can be, right? You want your readers to get the best possible story you can produce, right? You want five-star reviews on Amazon and Goodreads, right?’

Exactly

So when you’re looking for an editor, do make sure that you are very careful, make sure you both know what’s involved and what everyone’s expectations are. And do be ready to listen and take advice. That’s what your editor is there for.

Happy writing!

I’m currently offering a 10% on bookings taken before the end of January for February and March. My schedule is filling up fast, so do get in touch soon to discuss your project. You can use the ‘contact’ form or drop me an email at alisonewilliams@sky.com

 

 

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