‘Farmageddon – The True Cost of Cheap Meat’ by Philip Lymbery #TuesdayBookBlog #BookReview #NationalVegetarianWeek

In honour of National Vegetarian Week I’m re-posting a review of one of the best books I’ve read so far this year.

farmageddon

Amazon.co.uk   Amazon.com

A caveat before I begin this review – a very long time ago I worked for Compassion in World Farming. I’m also a non-dairy consuming pescatarian (occasionally eat fish but definitely no meat and no dairy or eggs) and am still a supporter of CIWF. Philip Lymbery is the CEO of CIWF, a charity that campaigns to end factory farming and to improve the welfare of farm animals around the world.

‘Farmageddon’ is a thought-provoking and very readable account of what is going on in the farming industry worldwide and how that not only has consequences for the animals but also for all of us. I have to be honest, I have a lot more respect for livestock farmers than I do for the majority of meat eaters who pop into the supermarket,  buy a £2.99 chicken for dinner and don’t for one second think about how that chicken was raised and killed so cheaply. The type of people who put their fingers in their ears and don’t want to know where their food comes from. People seem to still believe that pigs and cows and sheep and chickens all live on Old MacDonald’s farm, happily chomping away at grass in the fields or pecking in the farmyard, despite all the evidence that’s now available to the contrary.

The consequences of humanity’s reliance on meat are far-reaching and potentially devastating. This book explores in a thoughtful and intelligent way the disasters that have already been caused by our appetite for cheap meat – the decline in the number of birds, for example (in the last forty years the population of tree sparrows, grey partridges and skylarks, among others, have plummeted), the threat to bees, and the pollution caused by the need to get rid of the huge amounts of waste produced by the millions and millions of animals now being farmed.

I know from experience that people don’t want to be preached at – and this book isn’t preachy at all. The author isn’t trying to make you vegan – he is just telling you what he has seen, from China to the US, to South America and though Europe, and gives options and alternatives that could see an end to the suffering of those millions of animals (and they do suffer) and better health and a better environment for everyone.

This book is, in my opinion, an absolute must read. It isn’t always comfortable reading, but it’s time we pulled our fingers out of our ears.

5 stars

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7 comments

  1. I’ve no doubt it is well worth a read as is an older book: Food Politics by Marion Nestle and Michael Pollan. Alas, the thought of consuming what had recently been peacefully grazing on the grasses does not sound appetising to me…

    Liked by 1 person

  2. This is top on my tbr list. I have been a vegetarian for years, around 22, after I read animal farm. Not the George Orwell book. A woman went undercover inside an abattoir. I grew up on a farm which was still a bit like old MacDonald`s, lol, and I can remember when the government told the farmers on our island to change their feed for the cows. The farmers were not happy with it and predicted a rise in what they called, The Staggers. Well, it happened. Up till then our cows were fed on the grass they ate and turnips in the winter.

    Liked by 1 person

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